Monday, June 21, 2010

July/Aug Issue of Writer's Digest Out Now!

Looks like the main theme of this issue of W.D. is memoir--how to write and sell your memoir, with lots of tips, and well written articles, as usual from the good people at W.D. (Okay, a little brown-nosing never hurt no-body)

However, the very first article I went to was the Profile on one of my favorite authors--Charlaine Harris!

Zachary Petit did a fine job getting the nitty-gritty on Harris. You'll learn what she wrote and how she got her first gig as a writer--a lucky lady, but obviously very talented writer. I'm not going to tell you all exactly what is in this article, you've got to read it yourselves if you are a fan of Harris, or the genre itself.

As usual, W.D. seems to be on my wave length. Whenever I'm having trouble in some certain area of my writing, they seem to be thinking the same thing, and somewhere within the issue is my answer. This time it was in WORKBOOK--my very favorite thing about W.D. This article, "Raising the Stakes" was excellent. I needed this to help me in some area of my book that I hadn't addressed, couldn't figure out what was missing, and boing! There it was!

A must read--I've only had it over the weekend, and am still looking through. I thought the "Reject a Hit" by Donna Cameron of Brier, Wash. was excellent. I happen to know that Seuss was rejected multiple times--which gave me hope. But this rejection letter written for the WD challenge for a humorous rejection for their magazine was funny and well crafted.

Grab your coffee and your WD today!

4 comments:

  1. Thanks for the kind post about our latest issue! So happy to hear it's been helpful to you in your writing life.

    All best,
    Jessica Strawser
    Editor, Writer's Digest

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  2. Weird, Writer's Digest always seems to be on the same wave length as me too! They're awesome like that. :)

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  3. Very. But I think it is becaue we are all on te same wavelength. Once you are attuned to it, you should be able to expect these things. Just like when you suddenly have an answer to a plot problem, it's there when you think about it.

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